Fantasy Football Draft Analysis of the Official Fantasy Couch League

While a lot of people were drafting for their leagues from all over the country this past weekend, the writers and friends of Fantasy Couch also held their live draft.

The league we’re running is a 12-team, PPR (points per reception), with passing touchdowns worth six and a flex (RB/WR/TE). Our draft order was decided randomly, even though conspiracy theorists are trying to come up with something given who was awarded the first pick (Huseyin “The Brain” Aksu). But there was no funny business given that our draft order was picked out of a hat and there were no frozen papers or folded corners.

Like any draft, it was full of surprises. Some as early as the first round—which you can watch here:
CLICK HERE to watch our live, in-person draft. Yes, we have video footage of it!

Players slipped and jumped from where they were expected to go. The writers at Fantasy Couch are going to give you their take on their draft, from the best and worst picks and everything in between. Below are the superlatives and post draft analysis of the Official 2012 Fantasy Couch Football Draft.

2012 fantasy football analysis table

Like Huseyin, I feel the best quarterback this year will score the most points, and there is a good chance Mr. “Discount Double-Check” will be the guy atop all players at the end of the season. Spencer Firth isn’t as high on Rodgers though, and feels that Rice, who I took in the first round, will be the guy to beat.

Firth: “Rice led the NFL with 2,068 yards from scrimmage in 2011. He also grabbed 76 receptions, which was the second most at his position. Houston’s running back Arian Foster is his biggest competition for fantasy MVP, but Rice is only 25. I think we still have yet to see the best out of this elite running back. In fact, he could even surpass last year’s number of 15 all purpose touchdowns.”

Eggers: It is an easy choice in my book as Arian Foster is sure to be the most valuable fantasy player in 2012. With a pass-heavy league the position of running back has become thinner in terms of fantasy production the past couple seasons and figure to continue. Foster is the best running back in the league and is entering his prime at age 25, which spells BIG numbers barring injury.

As for this year’s breakout star, I went with Atlanta’s Julio Jones. I wanted to get him with my third pick in the draft but he was taken one spot ahead of me. If he can improve slightly on his sophomore season just a year ago that third-round selection could be one of the best picks in the draft. He is a big reason why I waited at quarterback and drafted his quarterback, Matt Ryan.

Firth: With the Broncos’ edition of QB Peyton Manning, WR Eric Decker is sure to have a breakout season in 2012. Denver reportedly plans on using Decker more as an outside receiver, as opposed to last year where he was mainly slot. Though WR Demaryius Thomas is considered more of a big-play athlete, Decker is considered the better route runner. Peyton Manning knows this.

Eggers: Detroit Lions’ wide receiver Titus Young is going to have a great season. He’s playing with one of the most high-powered offensive attacks led by Matthew Stafford and opposite of the game’s most dominant wide out, Calvin Johnson. Owners can look forward to a player with a lot of skill and upside who is in the right place, at the right time.

DeAngelo Williams slipped in our draft and found his way to the 13th round. I was tempted to take him in the 12th but grabbed Jones-Drew’s backup, Rashad Jennings instead. If Williams plays just 10 games this year he’ll get a return worth of such a late selection.

“The Brain”: “With Robert Meachem gone in New Orleans the opportunity for a very good season will be in order for Lance Moore. His value is even greater in PPR leagues like the one we’re in.”

Firth: “Romo continues to put up solid fantasy numbers year in and year out. He threw for 31 TDs and just 10 INTs in 2011, the best year of his career. If WR Miles Austin can have a healthy 2012, Romo is bound to please his fantasy owners once again. He isn’t ranked too high, and is a great value if available in the 9th or 10th round.”
Even before Ryan Matthews went down with an injury on his first carry of the preseason, I wasn’t high on the kid. According to FootballOutsiders.com, Ryan Matthews has been on the injury report 15 times in 32 career games. He’s a huge gamble I don’t want to take. Again, one carry, one injury. How many hits until he gets hurt again?
Firth: Trent Richardson has been going extremely high in the majority of fantasy leagues that I have seen. I could never waste such a high pick on a player that hasn’t yet proved himself in the NFL.

As for someone who is worth the risk I went with Detroit running back Jahvid Best. Yes, he won’t be available until week 6 and there is chance he doesn’t play at all this year, but if he does play a few weeks his 14th round selection by Jeremy Dunn will be worth it.

Firth: Michael Vick has been banged up in the first two pre-season games, but his explosiveness and leadership makes him worth the risk from a fantasy perspective. Just make sure to have a solid backup because he will miss time at some point in the season.

Andrew Luck was the consensus selection for best rookie for fantasy teams this year and Jeremy Dunn (Wine Her, Dine Her, 49er) had votes across the board for worst team drafted.

Eggers: Without a doubt the best rookie will be wide receiver Justin Blackmon of the Jacksonville Jaguars. The former Oklahoma State Cowboy figures to see a boatload of targets from quarterback Blaine Gabbert who desperately needs a playmaker on the outside. Blackmon has all the tools to be amongst the elite amongst fantasy wide outs in the future and should be a household name pretty quickly.
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The Fantasy Couch writers have spoken. Disgaree with our take or have any questions about our picks? Hit me up on Twitter @ThisJustM or tweet FantasyCouch.com directly @FantasyCouch to share your opinion or ask us questions during the season.

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