Long Beach City College wins women’s basketball South Coast Conference title

On a night when Coaches vs. Cancer raised money for the American Cancer Society, the Long Beach City College Vikings women’s basketball team clinched the South Coast Conference title with a 58-50 win.

Cerritos won the men’s game 70-66 as both teams clinched a playoff spot.

In the women’s game, Cerritos led for the majority of the first half but was unable to sustain the lead as the Vikings were able to rally behind sophomore guard Shakeena Benton, who scored 11 of her team’s 30 points in the first half and finished with a game-high 22.

The Vikings took advantage of the 3-point line early, with three of Benton’s baskets coming from long distance that half. Freshman guard Abbey Goodsell sunk two 3’s as well, with the first bringing Long Beach within three and the next one tying the game at 17-17 with 8:25 left in the half.

Long Beach City College wins women’s basketball South Coast Conference title

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Belmont Shore Chocolate Festival packed with fans

LONG BEACH >> Sweet tooth’s were being satisfied up and down Second Street on Saturday at the 10th annual Belmont Shore Chocolate Festival.

The chocolaty event is hosted by the Belmont Shore Business Association, and Executive Director Dede Rossi has been heading it up for four years.

“Any event we do down in Belmont Shore is to get people down the street to see what we have to offer,” said Rossi, who admits to being more of a vanilla girl. “We’ve had less than 20 restaurants in the past, but now we’ve got 30 restaurants participating.”

Belmont Shore Chocolate Festival packed with fans

 

 

Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority to hold final workshop on renovation

A Great Egret searches for a meal in an inlet next to the San Gabriel River in the Los Cerritos Wetlands, near Gum Grove Park, Seal Beach. Activists are worries that the change of the inlet could endanger nearby eucalyptus trees that are habitat for wetland. Wednesday, November, 13, 2013. (Stephen Carr / Staff Photographer)

 

LONG BEACH >> The last of a series of workshops on how to renovate and protect 500 acres of sensitive wetlands between Seal Beach’s Gum Grove Park and Pacific Coast Highway will be held next month.

The March 20 hearing is the culmination of a process to involve and recruit residents to help protect the Los Cerritos Wetlands near the San Gabriel River. This final workshop will look specifically at three separate restoration designs in order to finalize an outline to protect the sensitive habitat. The work is being facilitated by Long Beach-based consultants Moffatt & Nichol Engineers.

Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority to hold final workshop on renovation

LONG BEACH >> The last of a series of workshops on how to renovate and protect 500 acres of sensitive wetlands between Seal Beach’s Gum Grove Park and Pacific Coast Highway will be held next month.

The March 20 hearing is the culmination of a process to involve and recruit residents to help protect the Los Cerritos Wetlands near the San Gabriel River. This final workshop will look specifically at three separate restoration designs in order to finalize an outline to protect the sensitive habitat. The work is being facilitated by Long Beach-based consultants Moffatt & Nichol Engineers.

Mark Stanley, executive director of the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority, knows this initiative has been a long process; there are no quick fixes.

“We want to do the restoration to get these wetlands to where they were once before,” Stanley said.

Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority to hold final workshop on renovation

 

49er women win close game against Hawaii, blow out Fullerton

The Long Beach State women’s basketball team got back on the winning track by taking down the Big West’s top-ranked Hawaii in a 74-72 game that was close throughout.

The Beach got things started off how it had hoped, with good post defense and constant commotion down low. Senior Jade Wilson, who set a career-high 24 points and 10 boards, played a key role in the paint production as the 49ers didn’t rely on their outside shots. – See more at

49er women win close game against Hawaii, blow out Fullerton 

 

Dodger players make pitch for recess at Moffitt Elementary in Norwalk

A sea of blue Dodgers caps cheers on the former Dodgers in attendance for the Playworks event at Moffit Elementary. (Press-Telegram)

Dodgers legends Tommy Davis, “Sweet” Lou Johnson, Derrel Thomas and Tim Leary visited Moffitt Elementary school in Norwalk last week to promote the importance of recess.

The retired ballplayers who played as early as 1959 and as late as 1994 are just a few of the former professional athletes joining Playworks, a structured-play program designed to improve the physical and intellectual well-being of children through handball, jump rope, hula hoop, tag and other physical activities.

“What’s most important to us is helping students, families and schools understand that play is important for kids,” Playworks’ Southern California Executive Director LaVal Brewer said. “There are schools in the country who don’t even have recess.”

Dodger players make pitch for recess at Moffitt Elementary in Norwalk

 

Long Beach School for Adults celebrates 100 years

LONG BEACH >> The Long Beach School for Adults celebrated 100 years on Saturday, a milestone some feared the recent recession would keep them from reaching.

A group of about 30 faculty members and former students, some who have been with the program from the late 1960s, gathered in the school’s auditorium to share their experiences and hopes for the future.

Many thanks were made to the teachers and faculty members who have made adult school a springboard to success.

However, getting to this point wasn’t easy.

“This celebration today means a lot because we made it through a very tough period these last few years,” said Janet Cassara, English as a Second Language coordinator. “The program was once thriving but started to diminish in 2008.”

With cuts that took a $4.9-million budget to zero by 2011, LBSA was forced to rely solely on state funding and increased registration and class fees, while also losing programs like its High School Diploma program.

Classes that were once free now cost roughly $250 to $350 per semester. The school offers such classes as animal care, job skills, clerical and computer classes and a certified nursing assistant program. More than a thousand students a year earn their GED certificates through LBSA programs.

“Despite the budget crisis and the many obstacles faced, the program has continued to remain because of dedicated people in the community and the valuable teachers,” said LBSA Principal Matt Saldana, who is also principal of Beach High School. The two schools share facilities.

Long Beach School for Adults celebrates 100 years